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Advantages of Disadvantages

In his book “David and Goliath,” Malcolm Gladwell talks about cases where an apparent disadvantage may have helped an individual to actually perform better. He starts with the example of David, a small-boned shepherd who defeats the giant Goliath. Gladwell reasons that David was very light and quick on his feet, while Goliath was big, clumsy, . . . → Read More: Advantages of Disadvantages

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The Downside of Bonus

Dan Ariely, the renowned behavioral economist and the author of the widely popular book “Predictably Irrational” has some interesting things to say about the effect of massive bonuses and their true effect on job performance in his New York Times article.

Ariely and his co-researchers use some cleverly designed experiments to study the relationship between the magnitude of . . . → Read More: The Downside of Bonus

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Effect of Technology: Are We Seeing More and Thinking Less?

An article in Medical News Today asks “Is Technology Producing A Decline In Critical Thinking And Analysis?”

Much of today’s learning and research is relies on computer based search on the internet and multi-media presentations. A lot of information is made available very quickly, and often there is too much to process mentally to find the really . . . → Read More: Effect of Technology: Are We Seeing More and Thinking Less?

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An Interesting Speed Limiting "Nudge"

Here is an interesting “nudge” that I noticed near my local school recently. On one of the bigger streets adjacent to the school, the “School 25 MPH” sign tends to get ignored by many drivers; probably some larger signs would help. There is one particular intersection that gets really busy just before school time in the . . . → Read More: An Interesting Speed Limiting "Nudge"

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Too Many Choices Ruin The Sale

In his book “Blink,” Malcolm Gladwell describes an experiment where a store that offered over twenty different types of jam sold significantly less jam than another store that offered only six. Gladwell’s explanation for this is that when we are presented with too many choices, we get a lot of information to process and make a . . . → Read More: Too Many Choices Ruin The Sale

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Book Review: "Blink" by Malcom Gladwell

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

by Malcolm Gladwell

This is Malcolm Gladwell‘s second book after “The Tipping Point.”  In The Tipping Point, Gladwell writes about how sometimes things considered little and insignificant can unexpectedly cause big changes. Blink is about something very different; it is about how much information processing is . . . → Read More: Book Review: "Blink" by Malcom Gladwell

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The Reality Of Virtual Reality

Do you remember your very  first experience with virtual reality? Was it the flight simulator that you played on your PC? Or that car racing game on your PlayStation? Or tennis on your Wii?

It’s none of the above. You experienced virtual reality for the first time when you were a child, and someone told you a . . . → Read More: The Reality Of Virtual Reality

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Irrational Economics

Ever since I stumbled upon the book Predictably Irrational, I have been fascinated by the field of behavioral economics. I have looked for other books or articles on the subject, and found Freakonomics, Sway, and The Tipping Point, to name a few. Why did I find these interesting? It is because they seem to have the . . . → Read More: Irrational Economics

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What You See Is What You "Think" You Get

In his book “Blink,” Malcolm Gladwell writes about “Sensation Transference.” He describes what a beer manufacturer realized when they tried to figure out why their competitor’s beer was always doing better in the market, in spite of their beer being of good quality, having good advertisements, and having been priced competively. After a series of marketing . . . → Read More: What You See Is What You "Think" You Get

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What You Create Is What You Love

In his book, “Predictably Irrational,” Dan Ariely describes what he calls the IKEA effect.  This concept has been selected as one of  Harvard Business Reviews’  Breakthrough Ideas for 2009.

The essence of this effect is to make us “love what we build.” It’s what you feel when you go to IKEA (or Home Depot, or whatever your . . . → Read More: What You Create Is What You Love

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